EGG Meditation

by Rabbi Dr. Douglas Goldhamer

Chaim Vital, borrowing from the early mystics, teaches that the EGG represents the one who attains self-realization – a symbol of truth.  Chaim Vital also learned the following meditation from his teacher Isaac Luria, who taught that this meditation brings you to a conscious at-one-ment – at one with health, clear mind, with the awareness to see the Divine Light within, to experience contact with the large “I” of the Universe, with Hashem and to reunite Hashem with the small I, the Shechina within each one of us.  This meditation, when practiced regularly, results in strong health improvement. Doing this meditation regularly will strongly enhance your awareness of Hashem within you, as well as the Shechina, joining with Hashem.

  1. Sit relaxed, feel flat on the ground. Let your arms drop to your sides.
  2. Breathe in slowly and gently through your nose, and through your mouth. Recognize that you are breathing in the breath of God.
  3. Breathe in slowly through your nose and exhale through your mouth. Do this three times.
  4. Now breathe deeply through your nose down to the lower abdomen. As you exhale, feel all tension leaving and your body becoming more relaxed with each breath. You will feel yourself become lighter and more euphoric, with each inhalation and exhalation. You will feel a slight electrical charge, flowing through the terminals of your fingers and your toes, and right below the surface of your scalp as you exhale.
  5. All these feelings are the feelings of SPIRIT moving through you. There is no need to let it flow out of you. Feel it well up within you. Continue breathing deeply down to the lower abdomen and exhaling.
  6. Imagine a slow series of waves moving through your head. Focus on the waves, and be aware of the waves as they slowly move downward, into your throat, through your spine, through your chest, through your arms and hands to your lower abdomen, through your legs, to your feet.
  7. Now, inhale and exhale. Imagine these waves going through your entire body from head to toe. Stay conscious of your breathing.
  8. Now, visualize yourself within an oval-shaped egg, filled with clean, clear bubbly light. This subtle light is emanating all around you. You are in the oval-shaped egg with the light emanating all around you, and now this light creates a shell around you, a shell composed entirely of light. You are experiencing a light within a light. You are actually seeing your true self, with light emanating forth.
  9. Now, imagine yourself standing or sitting. Continue to breathe slowly and deeply, through your nostrils, the breath of God, and exhaling out through your mouth. You are now becoming one with the light of the shell around you.
  10. Yet, you can always, at any time, separate yourself from the shell. For example, now step out of the shell. Go back in the shell. Now separate from the shell and move out of the shell. The shell has a living consciousness. You and the shell can be one. But you and the shell can also seem like two. You and God are one. And yet, when we pray to God and look at one another, we seem separate from one another and separate from God. And so, move out of the shell. Feel free, feel joyous. And then move back into the shell. Remember the shell too has a living consciousness, as you do.
  11. When you go back into the shell, you bring the consciousness of the shell into your physical being.  When we see one another as separate from one another, or when we pray to Hashem, we bring the consciousness of Hashem into our physical being.
  12. Whether you are one with God, whether you are in the shell, or whether you feel you are separate from God, praying to God, the small I praying to the Large I, you still let the consciousness of God back into you.  Feel God within you, whether you are in the shell or out of the shell. God’s consciousness is always mixed with your consciousness.

When you remember this, when you live knowing this, your health and your spiritual health are highly enhanced. This mean, when you talk outside and share outside and lead prayer outside or do mitzvoth outside, even though you feel separate from God, from the shell, know that God is always within you.  Practice feeling this and living by this.  

This meditation of the Egg and your rebirth is Isaac Luria’s and Chaim Vital’s way of teaching that we are always being reborn in God.

We Are One

How to Identify the Inner I with the Greater I

A meditation taught by Rabbi Dr. Douglas Goldhamer from Healing With God’s Love.

Find a comfortable place and use this room, or part of this room, as your holy sanctuary. You should meditate in the same room every day, as then you will increase the energy in that place. The ancient Kabbalists call such a special place your mi’at meekdash – small holy place.

  1. Sit comfortably in a chair with your back upright and your feet on the floor. Loosen any belt or tie or clothing that might bind you. Close your eyes.
  2. Focus on your breath. Be aware of your inhaling and your exhaling. Do this for about two minutes.
  3. Breathe in gently, slowly and deeply, through your nostrils a long breath. Hold your breath for a few seconds and, as you exhale through your mouth, pronounce the ah sound, feeling it vibrate deeply in your belly.
  4. Breathe in gently, slowly and deeply, through your nostrils a long breath. Hold your breath for a few seconds and, as you exhale through your mouth, pronounce the no sound, feeling it vibrate deeply in your heart area.
  5. Breathe in gently, slowly and deeply, through your nostrils a long breath. Hold your breath for a few seconds and, as you exhale through your mouth, pronounce the khey sound, feeling it vibrate inside your head.
  6. Do this meditation ten times.

With this meditation we identify the Inner I within us with the Greater I of the Universe, that is, the Shechina within us with the transcendent male aspect of God, and so we become one with God. We see ourselves and we return to the recognition that we are not alone, we are not separate, but we are one with God.

Under the Wings of the Divine Presence

From the Pen of Executive Director Alison C. Brown

We read in Midrash Tanchuma Yitro, “However, Yitro heard and was rewarded.  He had been a priest of idolatry, yet he came and attached himself to Moshe, and entered beneath the wings of the Divine Presence.”

The cozy, safe, loving image of v’nichnas tachat canfei HaShechina, entering beneath the wings of the Shechina, invites me to eschew the earthy pleasures and distractions that, by all indications, I so worship.  Netflix for example.  My life was crazy, as most everyone’s was, from this past November until the first week of January.  Afterwards, I settled in.  My house was warm. I had a list of television series touted by my friends.  I escaped into Netflix as often as I could.  I forgot those pesky New Year’s resolutions, forgot the books I was so excited to read, and forgot that when the house was quiet I could meditate myself v’nichnas tachat canfei HaShechina.

Netflix certainly offers opportunities for growth.  I’ve learned addiction to prescription drugs can ruin your life.  I’ve learned that English midwives are dedicated, adorable game changers.  I’ve learned that a pretty Italian seamstress can make a clever spy.  And now, I am SO rested.

I am ready to ascend the mountain again.  I have texts to study and people to befriend.  I want to be aware and motivated by God, the Source of All who creates me anew every moment.  I want to turn off the t.v. and walk past all the other so accessible idols that beckon me – including the lovely cellophane wrapped brownie cookies that caused me pause at the grocery store.  In every moment I am face to face with God.  Al panai, before me, interpreted in the Mekhita de Rabbi Ishmael as a reference to both time and place.  We are always in God’s presence, we all stand at Sinai.  And, on occasion we need refueling.

We need entertainment too.  Movies, music, dancing, and yes t.v.  But I also want to grow into some version of my best self.  I am reading Sapiens, by Yuval Noah Harari.  He explains that large scale human cooperation is based on myth.  Change the myth, tell a different story and you can make large scale change.  While I’m open to all stories, I most appreciate the Jewish story.  I like having the opportunity to partner with a divine source who inspires me to think and do from Mochin de Gadlut – from a Greater Mind.  The change I want to see, that I want to be, is a world where problems contain within themselves a myriad of solutions.  Acting on them however, entails getting off the couch.

Zoning out with idols is easy.  Rabbi Arthur Green says that living a meaningful life requires creativity and moral action.  He learned this from our story.  This is why Yitro said, Exodus 18:11, “Now I know that the Lord is greater than all gods.”

Service of the Heart

I am writing my Rabbinic thesis on the idea that our thoughts ascend to God. Right now I am researching the practical application of that and reading a lot on consciousness. In some theories the role of images is a salient, albeit subconscious aspect of consciousness. The Zohar is a treasure trove of Jewish mystical images and symbols. I recently asked Hebrew Seminary Professor of Kabbalah Rav Rahmiel Hayyim Drizin, “Would you share with us a Zohar image that is meaningful for you especially as it might enhance our spiritual consciousness?”

Here’s an all-encompassing principle: What is above is below, and what is below is above. We know that the human is a microcosm of the universe, while the universe is a macrocosm of the human. And heaven and earth are mere reflections of each other.

What we do down here affects above, as the verse in Psalms says “Ascribe strength to G-d!” Our thoughts, ideally expressed through words and realized in deeds, rise to high levels, as the Talmud Berachot 6b notes that “prayer stands at the heights of the world.” But prayer first starts out here in our hearts, “the service of the heart,” and then it finds its way to the ear of G-d.

This brings to mind (thank you Rabbi Dr. Douglas Goldhamer) the great Sufi mystic and poet Ibn al Arabi’s teaching that, “He who knows himself, knows his God.”

Yes, we always talk about ascending. We have this picture in our mind that we are going up there to a higher, elevated world but in Kabbalah we yordei haMerkavah, we descend into the chariot. That means we go inward. Everything we need to know about is inside of us. Torah says, “Build me a mishkan and I will dwell within them.” We are not the Shechina, but the Shechina dwells in our heart. Those who know their heart for all of its beauty and passions, they know where God dwells within them and they can find their way more easily.  We have the power to figure it out. Learning Zohar and Torah is helpful for this. It’s all about consciousness. We need to let the light inside.

Rav Rahmiel Hayyim Drizin is Professor of Kabbalah at Hebrew Seminary. He was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, and moved to Chicago to go to Northwestern Law School. Reb Rahmiel is a devoted student of many of the leading teachers of Kabbalah in Israel and the USA. He is a criminal defense lawyer who lives in Oak Park with his family. Much of Reb Rahmiel’s work is available on line at www.kabbalahonline.org.